SIMPLY SOPHISTICATED DESIGN WITH A TASTE OF THE UNEXPECTED.

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

And what do you do with every last piece? Please tell us!

jill here.... Lucky us at market to be situated across from F+W Publications.  We were able to meet several authors during their book signings.  One author,  a midwestern friend of a friend is Lynn Harris.  The Little Red Hen is her blog site.  She is truly an inspiration for creating all those little scraps into beautiful quilts.   What a patient fabricator, savoring the minute details (not exactly my approach so I truly appreciate the differences).

 This is a copy of the book Every Last Piece.
Lynn's design foundation is traditionally based.   She takes different settings to add her modern touch  using scraps, strings and appliqué .

Inspired by retreat classes,
Gwen Marston played a role in Lynn's exploration
and made her a happy camper.

Stardust, queen size, is a beautiful display of
only 434 2'' finished stars.  

My greatest inspiration from the book is Lynn's instruction on
scrap management.  I occasionally work with controlled
scraps so moving out of my box will be the challenge.

So this is my present scrap management called ''throw it in the pile
and I'll deal with it later''.



Please comment on how you deal with your scraps.  You have random chance

to win a signed copy of this book!  Lucky you. Contest closed.

'till next Tuesday...

18 comments:

  1. I like the throw it in the pile approach too, but sorted by color and put in boxes to wait until...I get hold of this book! Looks great! Jane

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  2. I have been using my scraps for improvisational projects lately. I rarely throw any fabric out and am always looking for ways to use the "leftovers".

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  3. I've begun cutting scraps into squares and strips to try to get a handle on them! But it is difficult at times...still have my "bag of crumbs!"

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  4. I toss mine into fabric bins (the cube closet maid kind that you can get from WalMart, etc), sorted by size: small, medium, large, and low volume
    drlbennett at gmail dot com

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  5. My scrap bin stays close by. When I need a break from " hard core" quilting I take 5 minutes (or an hour!) and grab a few happy colors from that bin and begin sewing whatever it turns into. A plan usually forms as the pieces speak to me. Many mug rugs, pot holders, baskets, & bags have come about as a result. These things are put in a special box so I can grab one to gift as needed. Win win!

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  6. So far my scraps are sitting in a box while I try to think of something to make with them. I've never made a scrap quilt yet.
    Patty
    paweis at yahoo dot com

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  7. Mostly I keep processing them into specific sizes & bagging them. May or may not live long enough to actually USE them. Tho
    I'm excited. I just pulled strips for a foundation strip quilt so there's hope!

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  8. (sigh)
    That's the problem I'm having with my scraps!... I *don't* have a good system to deal with them!
    I don't throw any scraps out... I save it all...
    So far, I've been putting the larger scraps back in with it's yardage for storage... And the really small scraps from a project go together into a box or baggie, a "collection" of all the small pieces from that project ("scrapbook"/memory book style saving???!!)... This is not sustainable, of course...
    (sigh)
    Precutting my scraps into certain sizes did not work out well for me, though...
    I just really need some *great* scrappy projects to USE these scraps!!!!

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  9. How I deal with my scraps - Well, I don't. I would like to but so far it hasn't happened. Right now they are in a tote and a container. Each time I finish a project, I stack the scraps on top of others. No sorting. No organization.

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  10. I have piles and boxes of scraps. I started once to sew my asian fabric scraps together (15 minutes of play), and they multiplied as I found more scraps hiding. Now I have a pile of blocks, and more scraps than I started with. - they multiply when I'm not looking.

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  11. I have always used the 'Throw it in a tub and deal later' technique. But it is getting way beyond control anymore. So this winter I bribed a friend to come iron my strips and I cut into certain sizes after picking out 5 patterns to use the newly cut pieces in. Now they are at the ready when I want to begin a new scrap quiltm hopefully next winter!

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  12. Depends. Some fabric I save every scrap and sort according to color. Others I save bigger pieces and pile until I get around to cutting them in strips. These I sort according to size. When they get too small or I don't love the fabric I toss in a bag that I turn into dog and cat pillows for our animal shelter. I don't mind tossing them because I feel they are still being useful and it takes the burden off me of not wasting valuable fabric. Thanks.

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  13. I just have them in a plastic container. I need some organization!

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  14. I have several shoebox size plastic containers for scraps. Depending on their size, they get sorted into these containers by genre, i.e. Civil War, '30s, Christmas, etc. It's gotta be a pretty small scrap for me to throw it away because I almost always need small pieces for applique projects. The really small pieces tend to get thrown in together in a small tote bag. I might be insane, but I love going through that little tote bag looking for just the right little bit to use for a snowman's nose. It's like my very own treasure hunt:-).

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  15. Right now they are in a fabric bin that I made. Now that things are slowing down a bit I guess I'll be creating more scraps and am going to find another way to stash them.

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  16. I have at least 4 bins of scraps I cannot part with. I really could use this book!

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  17. I have scraps cut into standard widths and stored by size ��

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